Course Selection

Year 9 & 10

The drama course offered in Year 9 is an introductory course with a strong practical focus. You do not need to have had previous experience to be accepted into the course; however, you do need to be willing to participate fully in each class, work hard, keep a positive attitude and be prepared to have lots of fun. In general, most of the course will be covered in class, but from time to time you will be expected to learn lines and complete some preparatory work at home.

Course Content

  • Through games you will learn to increase your confidence, build social skills and develop the ability to think on your feet.
  • Through activities and exercises you will learn essential acting techniques for creating character and crafting a scene.
  • Through performance opportunities you will experiment with the conventions of drama and begin to appreciate the variety of approaches used by people in various times and places to build effective communication with an audience.
  • You will begin by learning some basic drama techniques of voice, body, movement and space, which you will then apply to the presentation of scripted drama.
  • The devising of an original performance or the production of a class play.

 

The Year 10 drama course builds on the practical skills taught at Year 9 and introduces a more analytical approach to role, characterization, text, genre, theatre history and production technologies. As with Year 9 you do not need to have had previous experience to be accepted into the course; however, you do need to be willing to participate fully in each class, work hard, keep a positive attitude and be prepared to have lots of fun.

Course Content:

  • Develop your confidence in performance.
  • Introduce drama elements, techniques and conventions, and give you the opportunity to use these.
  • Introduce you to the world of drama, theatre and performance.
  • Develop your ability to express your ideas and to create through drama.
  • Develop your ability to accept, build upon and be sensitive to the contributions of others in group situations.
  • Develop your drama literacy
  • Give you the opportunity to watch, appreciate and evaluate a variety of performances.
  • Work co-operatively to devise and perform short scripts, take text from page to stage.
  • Experiment with different forms and styles of drama and have the opportunity to develop and extend your personal skills and abilities.

Music is an essential part of daily life in all cultures of the world. Music engages students in a creative manner, develops analytical thought processes, and increases problem solving and collaborative skills. As well as providing opportunities to develop practical music skills, students will study music from throughout history. Music is studied across a variety of genres and styles.

The Y9 Music course is designed for students with a strong interest in Music, and who may or may not have had tuition on an instrument. Students will be encouraged to take up an instrument through our itinerant music program if they have not already. Students who have some experience as musicians will be given further opportunities for extending their skills and knowledge.

Course Content

  • Group Performance
  • Solo Performance
  • Guitar and Keyboard Unit
  • Composition and Song Writing
  • Digital Music
  • Contextual Studies

 

The Y10 Music course is designed for any student who wants to broaden their knowledge of music and develop their skills as a performer or composer. It is expected that all students in this course can play an instrument (voice is considered an instrument) with some competence and are continuing to receive instrument tuition. Students will have regular opportunities to express their musical skill and creativity.

Course Content:

  • Performance (Group and Solo)
  • Composition and Song Writing
  • Genre Studies (Contemporary, Classical, Jazz and Musical Theatre)
  • Listening Skills
  • Practical Knowledge of Music (Applied Theory)

Learning te reo Māori provides social, cultural, spiritual, cognitive, intellectual and employment related benefits for students. There are also other benefits from learning the indigenous language of Aotearoa such as enjoying an increased sense of belonging, helping to preserve our national taonga or treasures, gaining insights into our national heritage, and contributing to a more tolerant and enlightened future for Aotearoa. In addition, the programme provides a vehicle for students to engage in their culture in an informed and effective way as it assists to, “equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand their heritage and their place in it; and to critique and engage contemporary society.

Course Content

This is a full year programme of study of three periods per week in Y9 & Y10, designed to lead students on to Year 11. The programme encompasses all the disciplines of language acquisition as outlined in the NZ Curriculum:

Reo Whakaputa (Productive language).  Kōrero (Speaking), Whakarongo (Listening), Whakaari (presenting).

Reo Whakautu (Receptive language). Pānui (Reading), Tuhituhi (Writing) and Mātakitaki (Viewing).

Kapahaka. It is also extremely beneficial for the students to participate and commit to the school kapa haka group to extend and develop their understanding of tikanga (customs) through waiata and pōwhiri (songs and welcoming ceremonies).

Nohonga Whānau (Community Relationships) Whānau (Family),Tāku Rōpū Āko (School), Tāku Kāinga (Home), Ngā Kai (Food)

Te Ao Māori (Māori World view) Te Marae (Marae life), Tikanga Māori (Cultural aspects and customs), Kapa Haka Performing Arts

In Y9 Spanish you will learn to understand and communicate basic information in Spanish, work with some simple Spanish grammar and structures, and understand something of Hispanic life and culture. The course covers Levels 1 and 2 of the NZ Spanish Curriculum. Spanish may be an important element in future job prospects in tourism and commerce, and there may well be opportunity to travel for further studies. As with other language options, Spanish is a full year course.

Course Content may include:

  • Getting to know you
  • School and family life
  • Describing yourself
  • Sports and Leisure
  • Pets/Animals
  • Food
  • Telling the time
  • Spanish Geography & History
  • Design a game based on Spanish speaking countries
  • Spanish Films

 

In Y10 Spanish you will learn to understand and communicate basic information in Spanish, work with some simple Spanish grammar and structures, and understand something of Hispanic life and culture. The course covers Levels 3 and 4 of the NZ Spanish Curriculum. There are many exchange possibilities to go to a Spanish speaking country and Spanish may be an important element in future job prospects in tourism and commerce. Seniors students have the opportunity to go to a Spanish speaking country with the school. Year 10’s may be offered an opportunity to sign up for an overseas language trip in 2022.

Course Content may include

  • Understand, state, and ask about people, places, and things
  • Understand, state, and ask about the location of people, places, and things
  • Recognise, express, and ask about likes and dislikes
  • Recognise, express, and ask about obligations
  • Recognise, express, and ask about how they and others feel
  • Ask how to say something in Spanish
  • Ask for and respond to information about events in the present
  • Understand and talk about where, when, and how often activities take place

In Y9, you will learn to understand and communicate basic information in French, work with some simple French grammar and structures, and understand something of French life and culture. The course covers Levels 1 to 3 of the NZ French Curriculum. French may be an important element in future job prospects in tourism and commerce, and there may well be opportunities to travel for further studies. As with other language options, French is a full year course.

Course Content may include:

  • Getting to know you • School and family life • Describing yourself • Sports and Leisure
  • Pets/Animals • Food • Telling the time • French Geography & History
  • Design a game based on France • French Films

 

In Y10, you will learn to understand and communicate some information in French, work with more French grammar and structures, and understand something of French life and culture. The course covers Levels 3 to 5 of the NZ French Curriculum.

Course Content Includes:

  • Understand, state and ask about people, places and things
  • Understand, state and ask about the location of people, places and things
  • Recognise, express and ask about likes and dislikes
  • Recognise, express and ask about obligations
  • Recognise, express and ask about how they and others feel
  • Ask how to say something in French
  • Ask for and respond to information about events in the present
  • Understand and talk about where, when, and how often activities take place
  • Communicate about events in the past
  • Understand, ask about, and express future plans
  • Ask for and respond to simple directions
  • Understand and use words relating to measurement
  • Compare and contrast people, places, and things

 

There are many exchange possibilities to go to a French speaking country and French may be an important element in future job prospects in tourism and commerce. Senior students have the opportunity to go to a French speaking country with the school.

Year 10’s may be offered an opportunity to sign up for an overseas language trip in 2022.

The Art Department is offering exciting skill-based courses which are open to all students interested in the Arts.

The Y9 half year course provides students with opportunities to develop skills and knowledge reflecting New Zealand’s rich history of landscape art. They will learn to purposefully identify, describe and use various traditional art conventions. They will also explore their creativity through the study of various printmaking and painting processes.

 Course Content

• Compositional designing

• Printmaking using various processes

• Building up form and tone using paint processes

• Artist model analysis

 

 The Y10 course is an exciting skill-based course where students will have the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge. They will explore their creativity through the study of a wide range of art topics and disciplines. Currently covered in this course are: 3-Dimensional studies, Photography and Digital Art. While there is no prerequisite, students who have previously studied Art will be at an advantage. All topics in Year 10 Art enable students to gain a good foundation for further study and specialization in years 11 through 13.

Course Content

• Ceramics

• Mixed Media Painting

• Photography

• Digital Art

• Artist and painting analysis

The Y9  course encourages innovative design and problem solving to develop and present solutions for a range of design scenarios.

Course Content

Technological Design

  • Use the design process to research, develop, model, present and evaluate a solution for a given situation. • Technological Design activities and projects from a range of the following areas: Spatial Design, Product Design

Design theory and design language

  • Use annotations and labels to explain the functional and aesthetic qualities of design outcomes.

Visual Communication Techniques

Freehand Sketching

  • Explore freehand sketching within solid geometry • Develop freehand sketching and skills to communicate design ideas

 Instrumental Drawing

  • Develop foundational technical drawing techniques • Present final design outcomes using instrumental visual communication techniques • Accurately lay-out and present technical drawings • Develop computer aided drawing skills

Presentation

  • Explore a range of media skills to illustrate design ideas • Develop rendering skills for 2D and 3D design ideas to show shape, form and materiality • Learn compositional skills for effective presentation

 

The Y10 course encourages innovative design and problem solving to develop and present solutions for a range of design scenarios. The course is designed to prepare students for Year 11 DVC and beyond.

 

Course Content

  • Visual Communication and Design

Development of the design process to explore design solutions; Design theory and design language used to understand and explain the functional and aesthetic qualities of design outcomes; Freehand sketching techniques developed to communicate design process and outcomes; Instrumental drawing techniques developed to communicate design solutions incorporating standards and conventions; Presentation and compositional principles used to illustrate design solutions incorporating rendering techniques, and various modes and media.

 

  • Spatial Design

Exploring and developing a solution for a spatial design brief using the design process; Societal and environmental impacts/effects; Landscape, interior and architectural design.

 

  • Product Design

Exploring and developing a solution for a product design brief using the design process; Developing an understanding of functional and aesthetic properties of design materials; Modelling design outcomes for refinement and prototyping.

In Y9, this subject involves both practical work and theory. It is open to students of all ability levels.

Course Content

  • Codes of practice for all Technology processes and equipment used. • Emphasis on technical & practical skills • Using a template to produce a practical outcome that follows a basic Design Process that is fit for purpose. • Application of the Technological processes.

Technical Skills Developed

  • Construction of basic joints • Using various materials

Outcomes

Students will learn technical and practical skills which can then be applied in the design and manufacture of projects that are fit for purpose. Projects will need to be parent approved before construction begins and the material costs will be invoiced to parents.

In Y10, this subject involves both practical work and theory. It is open to students of all ability levels.

 

Course Content

  • Codes of practice for all Technology processes and equipment used.
  • This course is designed to involve students primarily in the use of timber as a material with some other materials also being used. Although a practical subject, students will use a range of technologies and processes to complete their projects.
  • The outcomes for all the different projects will go through a Design Process that will encourage the creative thinking of the students and create outcomes that will be fit for purpose.
  • Application of a range of technological processes.

 

Technical Skills

  • Furniture construction skills • Lathe work, timber joint work • Hand tool skills • Designing and evaluation

 Outcomes

  • Students will learn technical and practical skills which can then be applied in the design and manufacture of projects that are fit for purpose. Projects will need to be parent approved before construction begins and the material costs will be invoiced to parents.

The Y9 Food Technology course follows a technological approach to Food and Nutrition. Students will develop, refine and extend food skills and knowledge by doing practical food preparation and cooking each week. Adapting and modifying recipes is encouraged, as well as cooking at home.

Course Content

  • Food Safety Practices
  • Measuring and Knife Skills
  • Nutrients
  • Food and Nutrition Guidelines
  • Sensory Descriptors
  • Technology Project: Write a brief; Develop a recipe for a healthy snack (EG ice blocks); Evaluate
  • Design and create a 3D Gingerbread Sculpture

The Y10 Food Technology course follows a technological approach to Food and Nutrition. The focus of the course is for students to gain life skills and knowledge. Adapting and modifying recipes is encouraged, as well as cooking at home. This course is open to all and is a useful, but not essential, basis for Years 11-13 Food and Nutrition courses.

Course Content

  • Measuring and Knife Skills
  • Food Safety Practices
  • Hauora Wellbeing
  • Nutrients
  • Nutritional Assessment
  • Taking Action
  • Technological Products
  • Presentation and plating up
  • Technological Modelling
  • Characteristics of Technology
  • Food Citizenship
  • Edible Gifts

Digital technologies impact on every aspect of our lives and are vitally important to New Zealand’s growth in the 21st century. Students at Middleton Grange School need opportunities to develop knowledge and skills with digital technologies so they are equipped to respond to rapid changes in our society.

Y9 Course Content

Designing and developing digital outcomes

  • Follow a defined process to design, develop, store, test and evaluate digital content to address given contexts or issues, taking into account social, ethical and end-user considerations.
  • Be able to identify the key features of selected software (Publisher, Illustrator, Photoshop, or Paint) and choose the most appropriate software and file types to develop and combine digital content.
  • Understand the role of operating systems and are able to apply file management and security conventions.

Computational thinking for digital technologies

  • Decompose problems to create simple algorithms and then create computer programs to implement these algorithms. They will also learn how to problem solve and will be able to explain why things went wrong and how they fixed them.
  • Understand that digital devices represent data with binary digits and that these devices have methods of detecting errors in data storage and transmission.
  • Evaluate the efficiency of algorithms, recognising that computers need to search and sort large amounts of data.
  • Evaluate user interfaces in relation to their efficiency and usability.

Y10 Course Content

Designing and developing digital outcomes

  • Follow a defined process to design, develop, store, test and evaluate digital content to address given contexts or issues, taking into account social, ethical and end-user considerations.
  • Be able to identify the key features of selected software (Image creating/editing, multimedia and web development applications) and choose the most appropriate software and file types to develop and combine digital content.
  • Understand the role of operating systems and are able to apply file management and security conventions.

Computational thinking for digital technologies

  • Independently decompose problems to create algorithms from which they create computer programs with a range of inputs, outputs and logic operators. They will also learn how to use different control structures as well as variables for different data types.
  • Understand how to document programs in an organised way for testing and debugging.
  • Understand how computers store more complex data using binary digits.
  • Develop programs having regard for human-computer interaction (HCI) heuristics.

ELECTRONICS & ROBOTICS TECHNOLOGY (Y9 ONLY)

What makes a radio work? How do I get a light to flash? Can I get something to turn off later by itself? Students will learn what electronic components do and how to assemble them into working circuits. We learn how to read circuit diagrams, modify existing circuits to suit our needs and how to fix things that don’t work. Students learn construction techniques including soldering skills.

How does a computer count? Can I use code to program a robot? How can a device interact with the physical world? Students develop computational thinking as they write and modify code to control robots. They learn design skills that apply digital solutions to practical problems.

Course Content

Electronic Circuits

  • Understanding different components
  • Making electrical measurements
  • Testing and Fault Finding
  • Prototyping circuits

Robotics

  • Building and operating simple robots.
  • Designing and programming robots to carry out tasks, and complete challenges.
  • Using different input sensors to allow robots to interact with their environment.
  • Writing and adapting code in increasingly efficient ways.

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE & ROBOTICS (Y10 ONLY)

Computer Science relates to how computers work as well as how to apply computational thinking to solve problems. Computational thinking is essential for a successful student and is fun and challenging when taught in an electronic and robotic context. This is the right taster course for you if you are interested in future studies or a career in Computer Science, Electronics, Information and Communication Technologies, Mechatronics or Robotics.

Course Content

  • Designing and developing digital outcomes

Follow a defined process to design, develop, store, test and evaluate digital content to address given contexts or issues, taking into account social, ethical and end-user considerations. Be able to identify the key features of selected software (Text Editors, Programming Software) and choose the most appropriate software and file types to develop and combine digital content. Understand the role of operating systems and are able to apply file management and security conventions.

  • Computational thinking for digital technologies

Independently decompose problems to create algorithms from which they create computer programs with a range of inputs, outputs and logic operators. They will also learn how to use different control structures as well as variables for different data types. Understand how to document programs in an organised way for testing and debugging. Understand how computers store data using binary digits, how different algorithms and methods are applied to solve computing problems.

FINANCIAL LITERACY (Y9 COURSE)

We live in an increasingly complex financial and technological environment. Financial literacy is seen by many sectors of society as an essential life skill.

The Year 9 course equips students with the essential financial skills and understanding required in a technological society. This course is beneficial to any student as a stand-alone course but can also lead on to subjects such as Business, Economics and Accounting in future years.

Course Content

Concepts of Stewardship:

  • Choice, opportunity cost in time, skills and resource use • Moral, ethical and Christian responsibilities ie Fair Trade

Financial Literacy:

  • Development of Money as a medium of exchange • Personal Budgeting • Types and sources of Income • Purposes of Saving • Cash & Credit Spending

Consumer Law:

  • Rights and responsibilities • Fair Trading Act • Consumer Guarantees Act • Create a pamphlet or consumer Newspaper or consumer website page or educational blog or social media page

 

Economic Decision Making:

  • Complete an investigation for purchasing a product using on-line resources

BUSINESS STUDIES (Y10 COURSE)

This Y10 course introduces the basic ideas and skills of Accounting, Economics and Business. It is useful as a one-year stand-alone course or as preparation for any or all of these three subjects in the Senior College. You will learn how a small business operates and will, as part of a group of 3 or 4 students, plan and run your own small business during the course. If you make a profit, it’s yours! (After paying the tax which is donated to micro-enterprise loans in developing countries).

Course Content

  • Biblical principles and basic concepts of Economics
  • Business Accounting
  • Decision Making – New ideas in business (including a “Dragons Den”)
  • Enterprise Studies – Developing a business idea and starting, running, and managing a business
  • Producers, production, and resources
  • Risk – How can we overcome or minimise the problems?

Senior College

Level 1 Art: This is a prescriptive course based on the theme of “Containers and Containment.” This covers still life through to heritage and cultural relationships with land & taonga. We study drawing conventions from real life, experimental media and application, while emulating current New Zealand and international Artist models. This course is open to everyone interested in Art. It covers aspects of photography, photoshop, drawing, research, painting and design. Pupils work towards a 2x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation. There is also 1 x internal assessment.

Level 2 Design: This course is based around a class topic which is interpreted by each individual pupil. Starting from a drawing base, pupils learn to research ideas, develop concepts and edit work to present design-based outcomes created on the computer. Working with software, pupils learn to develop and present their work to a very high standard. Pupils work towards a 2 x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation and two internal assessments. This is a great introduction to the discipline of Design and a great foundation for Yr13 Art Design. Pupils use their own device.

Level 3  Design: This course is based around an individual topic for the year chosen by the pupil. Starting from a drawing base, pupils learn to research ideas, develop concepts and edit work to present design-based outcomes created on the computer. Working with software, pupils learn to develop and present their work to a very high standard. Pupils work towards a 3x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation and two internal assessments. Pupils use their own device. Pupils are encouraged to choose a topic they are passionate about. The type of work is varied in approach and application. At time pupils can complete work for real clients and outcomes. Typical topics could include; clothing brand, event management, festival, or a website. Pupils chose 6 items to promote.

Level 1 Art: This is a prescriptive course based on the theme of “Containers and Containment.” This covers still life through to heritage and cultural relationships with land & taonga. We study drawing conventions from real life, experimental media and application, while emulating current New Zealand and international Artist models. This course is open to everyone interested in Art. It covers aspects of photography, photoshop, drawing, research, painting and design. Pupils work towards a 2x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation. There is also 1 x internal assessment.

Level 2 Painting: This course is based on learning from using different media and methods relating to current practice and Artist models. Pupils learn to research, draw and create artworks from a chosen topic which they work from for the year. Pupils are taught drawing and are introduced to various media and current methods in Painting. They work towards a 2x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation and two internal assessments. This is a great introduction to the discipline of Painting and a great foundation for Yr13 Art Painting.

Level 3 Painting: This course is based on learning from using different media and methods relating to current practice and Artist models. Pupils learn to research, draw and create paintings from a self-directed topic which they work from for the year. Pupils are taught drawing skills and are introduced to various media, current methods in Painting and influence from Artists models. They work towards a 3x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation and two internal assessments.

Level 1 Art: This is a prescriptive course based on the theme of “Containers and Containment.” This covers still life through to heritage and cultural relationships with land & taonga. We study drawing conventions from real life, experimental media and application, while emulating current New Zealand and international Artist models. This course is open to everyone interested in Art. It covers aspects of photography, photoshop, drawing, research, painting and design. Pupils work towards a 2x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation. There is also 1 x internal assessment.

Level 2 Photography: This course is based around the discipline of Photography as a way of making pictures and using visual communication to connect with the viewer. Pupils choose their own area of study for the year and all their work is within their chosen theme. Pupils learn to use the camera as a tool from which they connect with the viewer. It covers many of the aspects of the art of photography, photoshop, & research. Pupils need their own camera but are also taught to use the studio area for shooting images. For original work and best practice work, pupils are encouraged to work from home as well as in class to complete set work and take their photos. Pupils work towards a 2x A1 board submission of their work for external moderation and two internal assessments. This course is great for pupils who wish to express themselves through Art but may not be strong at drawing.

Level 3 Photography: Pupils choose their own area of study for the year and all their work is within this chosen theme. The course covers many of the aspects of the art of photography, photoshop, and research of current practice. Pupils need their own camera but are also taught to use the studio area for shooting images and also apply some Photoshop skills. Pupils learn to use the camera on the manual settings for creative outcomes. For original work and best practice, pupils are encouraged to work from home as well as in class to complete set work and take their photos. Pupils work towards a 3 xA1 board submission of their work for external moderation and two internal assessments. This course is based around the discipline of Photography as a way of making pictures and using visual communication to connect with the viewer.

11ACT

In Year 11 Accounting we start the year by looking at how a household manages their finances. This is fantastic real-world learning, which opens up conversations within families and encourages the students to learn how to budget and take care of their money. We then move on to processing transactions through to financial statements, for a small sole trader business. 

The skills learned in this course are life skills, which are helpful for understanding finances, regardless of future career path aspirations. 

If a student thinks that they may be interested in taking a Commerce subject, but is not sure which one to take, we recommend that they start with Accounting, as this is the most challenging Commerce subject to pick up at level 2. 

12ACT

In Year 12 Accounting, we build on the learning from Year 11 and also tackle new Accounting topics. We learn about how a business tracks their inventory and tries to minimise theft or expired goods. We will usually go on a short class field trip to interview the manager of a large business, to learn how they record their inventory ins and outs. The decision-making internal assessment is also based on a real business, of the students choosing, which they research and then interview the owner/ manager. The third internal assessment is learning how to process financial records using a computerised system, such as MYOB. This is a skill that is immediately able to be used in employment.

All three internal assessments are new learning and the external assessments build on what was learned for the external assessments in Year 11. All Commerce subjects are language rich, offering both reading and writing literacy credits. If you would like to know more about this course, come and talk with Miss Gudsell in the office upstairs in K-block.

12EAI

This course provides an introduction to the basic ideas of Economics and Accounting.  It is designed for second-language students but is also very suitable for any student who would like to pick up one or both of these subjects in Year 12 but did not take them in Year 11.

The course can be Level 1 or 2 standards, depending on the ability and needs of the students.  The purpose is to prepare students for successful study in either or both of these subjects at Year 13 level in the following year.

Subject to consultation with Deans and/or the Curriculum Leader of Commerce, Miss Gudsell, the course can also be taken in parallel with the Year 11 or 12 Economics and/or Accounting courses, e.g you could take Y12 Accounting and also take Y12 Economics and Accounting for Beginners.

Further course details can be found in the Senior College Subject Choice Book.

13ACT

How do businesses make financial decisions? How do they determine a quote for a job? How do I decide what business to invest my savings in? You will be able to answer these questions and so many more with the learning in this course. 

We start the year with setting up a Partnership and distributing annual profit to the partners. Then we learn how to calculate a quote for a manufacturing job and the various processes involved in working out the actual cost of that job. We choose a well-known NZ company and dig into their most recent annual report to find out whether the business is a worthwhile investment. Lastly, we learn how to create a cash budget, calculate breakeven and make decisions for business success.

All Commerce subjects are language rich, offering both reading and writing literacy credits. If you would like to know more about this course, come and talk with Miss Gudsell in the office upstairs in K-block.

 

 

11BUE

This course is the best of both worlds, as it provides learning of both Business Studies and Economics. To keep students from having to choose too early, we have kept these two popular subjects together, to allow students to get a taste of both.

Business Studies will help students gain business knowledge and understand how businesses operate. Students will gain real life experience carrying out their own business in a small group. 

Economics is about choices consumers, producers and the Government make. In year 11, the focus is on individual consumers, producers and the market they operate in. Economics will help them understand how markets work and enable them to make economically sound decisions.

Students are able to gain 21 credits towards Level 1 literacy.

If you want to know more about the course, see Mr. Song in the Commerce office in K-block (upstairs).

 

12BUS

Are you a budding entrepreneur? Do you want to make money? Do you have a strong social conscience? Are you keen to help others or the environment through business? Are you hoping to be your own boss one day? If you have answered “yes” to any of these questions, then Business Studies may be the class for you!

Students who take this class will work in a small business group for the majority of Terms 1 – 3. Together they will plan to start their own business, selling either a good or a service. They will conduct market research, to learn more about potential customers and competitors. Then they run their business for two 6-week cycles, reviewing and making changes between cycles. 

All Commerce subjects are language rich, offering both reading and writing literacy credits. If you would like to know more about this course, come and talk with Miss Gudsell in the office upstairs in K-block.

 

13BUS

  • Would you like to run your own business?
  • Would you like to try running a small business as part of your Level 3 NCEA assessment?
  • Would you like to understand how small businesses and large businesses work?
  • Would you like to make the world a better place through running a business activity?

If the answer to any of the above questions is “Yes”, Year 13 Business Studies could be a very good subject for you.  Fifteen of the nineteen credits involve planning and carrying out your own small business activity.  This is done through the NZ-wide Young Enterprise scheme.  You will be one of hundreds of small businesses based in schools throughout New Zealand.  You will receive help from numerous people including your teacher-mentor, an outside business mentor and Young Enterprise advisors locally and nationally.  On occasions you will meet with business teams from other schools.

If your team carries out its business activity well, you might win a local or national award.  These can involve fully paid trips within New Zealand and overseas.  Middleton Grange students have won some of these awards in the past.

You will certainly experience what it is like to be an entrepreneur.  By the end of the year you will know whether you would be suited to a career in business. 

Plus, you get to keep the profits!  (After tax is paid of course!)

As well as the fifteen internal credits, there is also a four-credit external which looks at how large multi-national companies work.  

Business Studies is a UE and Level 3 NCEA subject and qualifies for Merit and Excellence endorsements.  You also receive an additional NZQA micro-credential for completing the Young Enterprise scheme.

Y11 Christian Studies

This is a compulsory subject that covers the metanarrative of the Bible whilst looking at life application. Pupils dip in and out of the large story of the Bible whilst looking at the overarching themes of the creation, fall and redemption of humankind. Whilst an academic subject, Christian Studies is all about learning and less about credits. It is designed to engage our young people in understanding how the Bible fits together, how and when it was written, understanding the message of redemption, discovering the major themes, and application to real life.

Y12 Christian Studies

At Y12, our pupils are eager to know more about other faiths and how faith impacts culture. The title of the course is ‘What is the purpose of life?’ and the first half of the year covers three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism and how they answer this question. It also looks at how these beliefs are lived out and impact society. The course starts with a brief introduction to apologetics.

The second half of the year pupils look at the purpose of life from the perspective of someone who does not believe in God. Secular Humanism is explored and how it answers Life’s Ultimate Questions on origins, meaning, morality and destiny and how the wider impacts of this belief are seen in New Zealand today.

A compulsory course, Y12 Christian Studies focusses on learning as opposed to credits. Six credits are offered on the Comparative Religion paper.

Y13 Christian Studies

An optional course, Y13 Christian Studies is great for anyone who wants an academic course that involves thinking, debating, discussing, researching, and looking at the big issues in life. The first paper, worth 6 credits, examines Worldviews and how they answer Life’s Ultimate Questions. Starting with the history of Secular Humanism and travelling through modern and post-modern thinking, it looks at how ideas have consequences and the impact these ideas have had on society.

The second paper is centred on the Bible, how it is the revealed Word of God and the history of how it came into being. This paper involves applying hermeneutical principles to a passage of scripture and looking at life application. It is worth 6 credits.

The third paper is Ethics. Ethical theories are considered and then a biblically-based understanding of ethics is sketched. These biblical principles are then applied to a contemporary ethical issue in New Zealand today. This paper is also worth 6 credits.

Christian Studies is perfect for anyone who wants to work with people or is a deep thinker or just wonders why!

Level 2 Classics:

Why would a civilisation build their city at the base of an active volcano? How did Percy Jackson come to be? From the interfering gods of Greek mythology, a city and inhabitants being buried alive, to the man who got lost on his way home and stayed that way for 10 years, Classics has it all.  Study the Art of the ancient world; their impressive sculptures and how their artistic ideals developed over centuries. With captivating content and engaging discussions, you will leave with the knowledge and understanding to critically analyse how the ancient world influenced the foundations of our world today. Come and learn about how an ancient civilisation lived. Discover what has endured and what was lost to time. 

Classics is English rich and offers literacy credits in both reading and writing. 

If you want to know more come and see Miss van upstairs in the K Block office 

Level 3 Classics:

Travel back in time to Ancient Rome where there is more learn than meets the eye. From the gladiators and every day Roman life up to the misleading propaganda that influenced both Adolf Hitler and Napoleon Bonaparte in their political campaigns.  Travel to Ancient Greece where we learn about Alexander the Great. You must have heard of him but how much do you REALLY know? From brilliant battle strategies, mysterious murders and his scandalous love life – we cover it all. Come and learn about a subject which will make you view the world in a whole new way as you discover how we have been heavily influenced by civilisations and people that have come before us. 

Classics is English rich and offers literacy credits in both reading and writing. You do not need to have completed Year 12 Classics to take it up in Year 13. 

If you want to know more come and see Miss van upstairs in the K Block office

11 Digital Technology Computer Science (DTC)

11 Digital Technology Computer Science (DTC) is for students who enjoys computer science and programming. This is an Achievement Standards based course designed to provide a solid foundation for careers in computing, especially software engineering, and the study of computing at tertiary Level. It provides the foundation for more advanced courses in computer science in years 12 and 13. Topics covered in this course are:

  • Planning skills
  • Programming
  • Database
  • Computer Science – Compression coding

12 Digital Technology Computer Science (DTC)

12 Digital Technology Computer Science (DTC) is for students who enjoy computer science and programming. This is an Achievement Standards based course designed to build on the knowledge gained in Level 1 DTC. It is designed to provide a solid foundation for careers in computing, especially software engineering, and the study of computing at tertiary Level. It provides the foundation for a more advanced course in year 13. Topics covered in this course are:

  • Planning skills
  • Programming (Intermediate level)
  • Database (Intermediate level)
  • Various Computer Science Topics which may include – computer security, encryption, error control, complexity and tractability, and/or artificial intelligence

13 Digital Technology Computer Science (DTC)

13 Digital Technology Computer Science (DTC) is for students who enjoy computer science and programming. This is an Achievement Standards based course designed to build on the Level 2 DTC course.  This course is designed to provide a solid foundation for careers in computing or the study of computing at tertiary Level. Topics covered in this course are: 

  • Planning skills
  • Programming (Advanced level)
  • Database (Advanced level)
  • Various Computer Science Topics which may include – complexity and tractability, computer vision, big data, computer graphics, formal languages, network communication protocols

11 Digital Technology Application (DTA)

11 Digital Technology Application (DTA) is 100% internally assessed and self-paced. It is designed for pupils who need basic digital technologies skills for education and personal use. It is suitable for students with language or other difficulties and preference will be given to such students. Topics covered in this course are:

  • Desktop Publishing
  • PowerPoint Presentation
  • Text and Information Management
  • Basic Web Page Development
  • Excel Spreadsheet
  • Typing

12 Digital Technology Application (DTA)

12 Digital Technology Application (DTA) is 100% internally assessed and self-paced. It is designed for pupils who need digital technologies skills for education, personal or vocational use. It is suitable for students with language or other difficulties and preference will be given to such students. Topics covered in this course are:

  • Desktop Publishing
  • PowerPoint Presentation
  • Text and Information Management
  • Web Page Development
  • Excel Spreadsheet
  • Schematic Diagram Creation
  • Digital Images Creation
  • Typing

13 Digital Technology Application (DTA)

13 Digital Technology Application (DTA) builds on the Level 2 Digital Technology courses and is 100% internally assessed and self-paced. Students have an opportunity to propose, plan, design and create a digital project. It is designed for pupils who need intermediate level digital technologies skills for further educational, personal, or vocational use. Topics covered in this course are:

  • Integrate Data and Images on a Word Processing Document
  • Interactive Website Development
  • Interactive PowerPoint Presentation
  • Desktop Publishing
  • Plan and Develop a Digital Project

11 Digital Technology Media

11 Digital Technology Media is for students who enjoy planning for and developing digital media such as digital images, desktop publishing documents or video. This is an Achievement Standard based course designed to provide a solid foundation for careers or tertiary study in design and media technologies. It flows into courses at Level 2 and Level 3. Topics covered in this course are: 

  • Planning skills
  • Presentation Skills 
  • Digital Media Creation and Editing using Photoshop or other image development editing/software
  • Computer Science – Human Computer Interaction

12 Digital Technology Media

12 Digital Technology Media is for students who enjoy planning for and developing digital media such as digital images, desktop publishing documents or video. This is an Achievement Standard based course designed to provide a solid foundation for careers or tertiary study in design and media technologies. It flows into a Digital Media course at Level 3. Topics covered in this course are: 

  • Intermediate Planning skills
  • Presentation Skills 
  • Digital Media Project
  • Digital Media Creation and Editing using Photoshop or other image development editing/software

13 Digital Technology Media

13 Digital Technology Media provides a solid foundation for a career or tertiary study in design and media technologies. Students in this course will investigate, plan, design, create and evaluate a digital media outcome such as printed media, video presentation or website. Topics covered in this course are: 

  • Advanced Planning skills
  • Advanced Digital Media Project (desktop publishing, website or video)

Design & Visual Communication

 

Year 11

Design and Visual Communication is an entry level subject at Y11 – no previous experience is required. Pupils are instructed in the nature and principles of design by which they explore design options through a range of visual communication skills in both product and spatial design projects. The core skills explored and developed include: the design process, freehand sketching, instrumental drawing, and presentation. For new pupils, an interest and competence in freehand sketching of any kind is significantly advantageous. Pupils who have undertaken a junior level DVC course will be familiar with the nature of the course as the same knowledge and skills are engaged for further development. DVC is relevant to a very wide range of career and employment situations, including all trades, a career in any kind of design, technical information communication, engineering and technology studies including university study, and any work that requires understanding or working with design and drawings. Talk to Mr. Bowater for more information.

Year 12

Pupils should have successfully completed a Y11 DVC course to consider Design and Visual Communication at Y12. The course is based on either a product or spatial design and further develops acquired skills in the design process while also incorporating further development of a wide range of visual communication skills and techniques. Design projects are self-selected from either product or spatial options, however, in some circumstances, both can be pursued. Exceptions for entry can be made, however, there must be an acknowledgement that attaining the full range of NCEA credits becomes unrealistic for pupils taking on DVC at Y12 for the first time in the senior school. Previous experience at a junior level would be advantageous.

Year 13

Pupils who have not successfully completed a Y12 course should not be considering undertaking a Y13 level course of study in Design and Visual Communication. The subject builds on skills established through years 11 and 12 and follows a very similar approach to work completed at Y12. It allows for a wide range of design options that can be selected by pupils from their own areas of interest. Exceptions can be considered for pupils who were successful with a Y11 DVC course.

Who should study Drama:

  • Everyone who will need to persuade, convince, debate, inspire, negotiate, sell
  • Everyone who will need to communicate an idea, an understanding, a discovery, a need, an opinion, a thought, a discovery, a feeling, a decision
  • Everyone who will need to manage, to lead, to build community

The Dramatic Arts are proven to have positive, lasting effects on the development of young people and their overall success at school and beyond.  The readily transferable skills of the Drama classroom top the lists of what employers are looking for

What does a course of study in NCEA Drama entail?

Years 11, 12 and 13 Drama students will undertake a full year’s journey in the development and use of the skills, techniques and conventions of drama presentation, drama creation, drama interpretation and effective communication.

At each year level the course work engages students in:

  • The decoding of text –
    • understudying what is being said
    • discerning what is not being said, but what is motivating the speaker
  • Understanding and utilising non-verbal communication skills
    • Body language, gesture, posture
    • Facial expression
  • Effective communication
    • How to project
    • How to convince
    • How to influence
  • Working cooperatively
    • Negotiation
    • Improvisation
    • Focusing on the tasks rather than feelings about the task
    • Accepting critique
    • Following direction
  • Problem solving
    • Finding creative solutions
    • Identifying and meeting audience expectations
    • Working within the limitations of a genre
    • Working within time constraints
    • Working within a budget
  • Identifying and building personal skills and capacity in order to:
    • Serve a character, relationship, situation
    • Serve a script
    • Serve an audience

Assessments are performance based, supported by brief statements of intention.

This course is designed for Year 12 and Year 13 students who are interested in a career working with children, primarily in an Early Childhood Education Centre or Primary school. However, the course is also designed to support those interested in working with people in careers like Social Work and Nursing. The course sets the foundation for understanding children’s development and learning in the wider context of community, culture and ethics.

The course involves work experience in an Early Childhood Centre and the Primary school. Some of the visits are in school hours and some are outside school hours. There is a practical component including Sign Language, music, art, resource making and Te Reo.

Personal development and growth is an important aspect of the course with various tools used to foster this including the Strengths Finders team coaching.

The Year 12 and 13 courses can be taken consecutively or separately. In consultation with the students, and based on their interests and academic needs, the course will be finalised in February 2021. Please see Mrs Bisseker if you have any queries or want more information about the course.

11BUE

This course is the best of both worlds, as it provides learning of both Business Studies and Economics. To keep students from having to choose too early, we have kept these two popular subjects together, to allow students to get a taste of both.

Business Studies will help students gain business knowledge and understand how businesses operate. Students will gain real life experience carrying out their own business in a small group. 

Economics is about choices consumers, producers and the Government make. In year 11, the focus is on individual consumers, producers and the market they operate in. Economics will help them understand how markets work and enable them to make economically sound decisions.

Students are able to gain 21 credits towards Level 1 literacy.

If you want to know more about the course, see Mr. Song in the Commerce office in K-block (upstairs).



12EAI

This course provides an introduction to the basic ideas of Economics and Accounting.  It is designed for second-language students but is also very suitable for any student who would like to pick up one or both of these subjects in Year 12 but did not take them in Year 11.

The course can be Level 1 or 2 standards, depending on the ability and needs of the students.  The purpose is to prepare students for successful study in either or both of these subjects at Year 13 level in the following year.

Subject to consultation with Deans and/or the Curriculum Leader of Commerce, Miss Gudsell, the course can also be taken in parallel with the Year 11 or 12 Economics and/or Accounting courses, e.g you could take Y12 Accounting and also take Y12 Economics and Accounting for Beginners.

Further course details can be found in the Senior College Subject Choice Book.

 

12ECO

Economics provides excellent insight into the world we live in. Year 12 Economics covers macroeconomics in the context of New Zealand economy. The topics that will be covered include inflation, economic growth, unemployment and government policies. Economics students will be well equipped with analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as the ability to work well either alone or within a team.

This course is open to students who did not take Economics in Year 11.

If you want to know more about the course, see Mr. Song in the Commerce office in K-block (upstairs).

 

13ECO

Year 13 Economics is the perfect combination of numbers and words. The focus in this course is on the market system, why market failure occurs and the role of the Government to correct it. There is also a more in-depth learning of macroeconomics. Students develop reasoning and analytical skills that will help them to present and interpret economic data and arguments in a clear and coherent manner. 

Economics is relevant to numerous careers, including the fields of business, accountancy, political science, the government sector, social science and voluntary community organisations.

Students are able to gain 20 credits towards Level 3 literacy. The course is also open for students who did not do Economics in Year 12.

If you want to know more about the course, see Mr. Song in the Commerce office in K-block (upstairs).

ESOL classes cater for the English language needs of international students, and domestic students for whom English is an additional language. In 2021, support will be offered as required in the Middle School. For Senior College, in Years 11 and 12, students are supported to develop their knowledge of English and are assessed using both English Language standards and NCEA English. In Year 13, students focus on gaining minimum literacy for University Entrance using NCEA Level 2 English standards.

Food and Nutrition is far more than “cooking”. Yes, you will cook delicious, healthy food once a week, but you will also gain an understanding of the bigger picture of health in New Zealand: the social and environmental factors that affect health and wellbeing. 

In Year 11 you will learn about which foods contain which nutrients and how to create a balanced, healthy meal. We also look at food safety and the external influences on our food choices (things like culture, advertising, and peer pressure) and how these can impact our Hauora. We look at the connections between nutrition and various health outcomes including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity.  

In Years 12-13 Food and Nutrition is the subject to take if you are passionate (or curious) about topics like health, equality, and justice: We challenge misconceptions and conflicting nutrition information. We discuss big issues like poverty and the role Determinants of Health play in health inequalities in New Zealand. We evaluate how socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable food-related practices really are. We delve deep into ethical dilemmas and challenge harmful messages in advertising. 

French is a vital, international, and widely taught language. It is the fifth most widely spoken language in the world and the second most widely learned (after English). The Alliance Française operates the biggest international network of cultural institutes. On the internet, it is the 5th most used. French is the international language of cooking, fashion, theatre, the visual arts, dance and architecture. There is a wealth of culture in French literature, cinema and music.

Many international organisations (UN, EU, UNESCO,NATO, Olympic Committee, Red Cross, to name a few) use French as a working and official language. In Europe, French is the language of the three cities where the EU institutions are headquartered: Strasbourg, Brussels and Luxembourg.

France has a huge economy and is a leading destination for foreign investment. Our Pacific region has a number of French speaking countries, and French is spoken on every continent. French is spoken in about 30 countries and there are wider job opportunities for those who speak French. Learning, and continuing to learn, French gives more opportunities to students who have studied French at school. The benefits of learning another language are too numerous to list here. 

There are a number of official Ministry of Education exchanges to French speaking countries, which students can apply for. Every two or three years, we try to travel to a French speaking country for a school trip. France is the most visited country on the planet, attracting about 87 million visitors each year.

Level 1 Geography

Geography makes links between many disciplines and ties them together into big-picture understanding of the world. But what, exactly, does that look like in Year 11? We investigate the sustainable use of Natural resources in Canterbury, keeping it close to home and relevant for pupils. They are asked to explore the choices we make about the way we interact with our environment, and the ways we might be able to do that as better stewards. We study the natural processes that produce Tropical Cyclones and the way humans can respond in a crisis. Again, this is our ‘back yard’ in a sense and is about “loving our (Pacific) neighbours as ourselves”. On a global scale, pupils will look into the pattern of Child Labour, understanding the complex causes behind this issue and the ways we can be part of a solution. In amongst all of this, pupils will develop a range of practical Skills for mapping, graphing, interpreting data in a variety of forms and communicating effectively in a range of modes. Feel free to come on up to the Humanities Office (next to K204) if you have further questions, or email the Curriculum Leader, Mr Elder, at d.elder@middleton.school.nz 

Level 2 Geography

Geography Level 2 builds on the foundation laid at Level 1. This should not put anyone off taking it for the first time at Level 2. So, what exactly will you be in for? Our contemporary issue is focussed on the question of energy production in New Zealand. Pupils are able to exercise some personal choice as they explore the strengths and weaknesses of the options. Nuclear? Hydro? Wave Energy or Biofuel? You decide. We develop this into a real-world investigation when we research the feasibility of installing Solar PV at Middleton. Development and Inequality is examined in the context of Tanzania. This topic builds on the social justice theme introduced through Child Labour at Level 1. Our other overseas setting is the fascinating residential pattern in Singapore – imagine living in a country of 5 million, not much bigger than Lake Taupo, where nearly everyone is restricted by law as to the location and type of house they can own! In amongst all of this, pupils will develop a range of practical Skills for mapping, graphing, interpreting data in a variety of forms and communicating effectively in a range of modes. Feel free to come on up to the Humanities Office (next to K204) if you have further questions, or email the Curriculum Leader, Mr Elder, at d.elder@middleton.school.nz 

Level 3 Geography

Geography at this level is challenging – but so are the issues in our world that we are studying. Global sea level rise and a changing climate, housing 9 Billion people in an age when within our lifetimes more than half the world’s people will dwell in slums…..these and other issues like them require some deep thinking.  For those with a more scientific focus, the course is balanced with investigation of the fascinating geology, climate, and volcanology of the North Island’s central plateau. Along the way pupils will develop a range of practical Skills for mapping, graphing, interpreting data in a variety of forms and communicating effectively in a range of modes. Feel free to come on up to the Humanities Office (next to K204) if you have further questions (especially if you are considering taking it for the first time), or email the Curriculum Leader, Mr Elder, at d.elder@middleton.school.nz 

Level 1 History

Those who don’t learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana

Skills Developed:

The study of History is so much more than just learning dates, names, and places of the past. As an academic subject History develops critical thinking skills that will assist in all aspects of life and benefit you in your other subjects. In History, we analyse evidence to interpret what is true of the past and critique how others have interpreted the past. By developing these high-level thinking skills through studying History, pupils are confident in engaging with contemporary issues. Some of the key skills that we focus on are research based, evaluating significance, weighing up different perspectives and analysing cause and effect.

Topics Covered:

In our Level 1 course we investigate 3 key topics. The first is the 1981 Springbok Tour in which mass protest erupted across New Zealand due to the South African Rugby team touring the country. Secondly, we explore the period between the two World Wars to identify the origins of World War 2. Finally, we explore the Black Civil Rights Movement in the United States, this helps deepen understanding of the current race issues in the world.

Additional Information

Here is what past pupils say about History:

Studying History throughout High School has really aided me in my first year Law course. It helped me develop critical thinking skills, analysing documents and presenting an argument.

Luke, first year law student, Canterbury University.

The skills you learn in history are very transferable, especially in subjects like English and Christian Studies, which made those assignments a lot easier. 

Francesca Harrison, Canterbury University.

Level 2 History

“In history, a great volume is unrolled for our instruction, drawing the materials of future wisdom from the past errors and infirmities of mankind. “Edmund Burke

Skills developed:

The study of History is so much more than just learning dates, names, and places of the past. As an academic subject History develops critical thinking skills that will assist in all aspects of life and benefit you in your other subjects. In History, we analyse evidence to interpret what is true of the past and critique how others have interpreted the past. By developing these high-level thinking skills through studying History, pupils are confident in engaging with contemporary issues. Some of the key skills that we focus on are research based, evaluating significance, weighing up different perspectives and analysing cause and effect.

Topics Covered:

In our Level 2 course we explore a wide range of world and New Zealand topics. We begin by investigating how Antarctic exploration impacted on Christchurch or looking into how police interacted with Pasifika people during the 1970s, more commonly known as the Dawn Raids. Additionally, we delve into how Russia became a Communist state and the impact this had on global politics or the American involvement in Vietnam. We conclude by looking into the Parihaka movement and the differing perspectives surrounding that.

Impact out of the classroom:

This course provides some literacy credits for University Entrance. Please come see Mr Checketts in the humanities office if you want to know more.

Level 3 History

“History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.” 

Maya Angelou

Skills developed:

The study of History is so much more than just learning dates, names, and places of the past. As an academic subject History develops critical thinking skills that will assist in all aspects of life and benefit you in your other subjects. In History, we analyse evidence to interpret what is true of the past and critique how others have interpreted the past. By developing these high-level thinking skills through studying History, pupils are confident in engaging with contemporary issues. Some of the key skills that we focus on are research based, evaluating significance, weighing up different perspectives and analysing cause and effect.

Topics covered:

At level 3 we investigate what were the causes of the First Crusade and the effects that has had on the world. We do a research-based assignment on the Early Contact period in NZ where pupils can choose from a wide range of topics to learn about. We conclude by looking at Tudor England History by investigating the Spanish Armada attempted invasion of England and the execution of Mary Queen of Scots.

Impact out of the classroom:

This course provides some literacy credits for University Entrance. Please come see Mr Checketts in the humanities office if you want to know more.

Year 11 

Mathematics is compulsory in Year 11 and pupils need to gain a minimum of 10 numeracy credits to gain Level One NCEA. 

In Year 11 we offer 4 different Mathematics courses to cater for the range of needs and abilities of our pupils. On their option sheets pupils will choose “Mathematics,” but our Mathematics teachers will place them in the various courses. Most pupils will be placed in the standard course (Mathematics). The four courses are outlined in the Senior College course option booklet.  

In Term Four, pupils will be selected for the Extension course and these parents will be notified. Also, parents and caregivers of pupils who we think are best suited for the Mathematics Core or Numeracy courses will be contacted to ensure they are aware and happy with this choice.  

Please feel free to contact your pupil’s Mathematics teacher or Mrs Louise Arndt (Curriculum Leader Mathematics and Statistics) to discuss course placement further. It is important that we place your child in a course that is going to challenge them and enable them to succeed. It is also encouraged that parents have this conversation with their child.  

Year 12 

At Year 12, Mathematics and Statistics is no longer a compulsory course. However, we encourage pupils to take a Maths and Stats course in Year 12 and our courses suit most needs. There are two Mathematics and Statistics courses available: Mathematics Akoranga and Mathematics Tumu. Pupils may choose either or they may even wish to take both.  

The 12 Akoranga course is designed for able mathematicians. It is a big step-up from 11 Maths. The 12 Tumu course is designed for those who are okay at maths, but would struggle with advanced algebra. 

 Pre-requisites for 12 Maths Akoranga: Entry: 14 credits at Level 1 including Merit in two of Algebra (91027), Relationships (91028) or Geometric Reasoning (91030). For pupils who have coped well with Year 11 Maths in 2020.  

20 credits including 3 externals. 

Pre-requisites for 12 Maths Tumu: Entry:  11 credits from 11 Maths or 16 credits from Year 11 Math Core. The Tumu course is for pupils who would struggle with advanced Algebra.  

19 credits including 1 external. 

13 Calculus and/or 

13 Statistics and/or 

13 Maths and Stats 

13 Statistics and/or 

13 Maths and Stats 

 

Year 13 

There are three courses available. Pupils might choose to take one or more of these courses.  

Calculus: Advanced Mathematics involving Trig, Calculus and Complex Numbers. 

Anything to do with Engineering, the Physical Sciences, Health Science, Veterinary Science, Economics, Architecture, Surveying, Optometry, some Computer Science courses, advanced Statistics, Mathematics itself. Note that Statistics is also useful in these courses, so taking both courses would be sensible. 

Statistics: Involves data investigations and Probability 

Statistics is often part of many degree courses in Science and Social-Science related courses.  Forestry Science, the Biological sciences, Veterinary Science, Health Science, Management, Psychology, Geography, Sociology, Planning, Physical Education. 

Maths and Statistics:  

Involves applied mathematics, a data investigation and some probability. 

This course would be useful for pupils who want a mix of Statistics and Mathematics standards. This course would be useful for any of the fields of study mentioned in Statistics above. 

Music education provides a wide range of benefits to a maturing mind. It develops personal skills and traits such as self-discipline, perseverance and reflective practices. Group work and performances provide a platform to extend collaborative skills and critical thought processes. Our Music programme values student’s experiences and builds on these with increasing sophistication and complexity as their knowledge and skills develop throughout NCEA. The programme is designed for any student who wants to extend their knowledge of music and develop skills in their unique musical strengths. At Year 11 students receive a well-rounded musical education that covers the key skills and disciplines – Communicating and Interpreting, Developing Ideas, Understanding Context, and Developing Practical Knowledge. From Year 12 students are able to gradually refine their study programme to focus on the areas of music that they are passionate about or have strengths in. You can read more about the Year 12 Pathways and the Year 13 Achievement Standard options in the Course Outlines.

The countries and cultures of the South Pacific form an integral part of New Zealand’s own culture and identity.  Their histories are intertwined in many ways.  There are hundreds of stories to explore and discuss amongst our shared history.  Pasifika Studies will use multiple Achievement standards to discover more about Pasifika indigenous knowledge, society and culture, music and dance, history, art, and identity.  You’ll look into the history of Pasifika both in its home countries and all over the world.  There will be opportunities to hear different experts speak from all different walks of life, to utilize the Macmillan Brown library, and even use the experiences of parents, friends or your own personal ones to craft your work. Assessments will take form with a variety of options including presentations, speeches, essays, artistic displays and more.  

Physical Education: NCEA Level 1-3

The aim of our programme is to provide a balanced a programme that relates to our core Curriculum Concepts. These areas are … learning through movement about self, others, and society.

Whether a student moves towards a career in sport or not outside of school, our intention is to give them a holistic course geared towards working in a team. The main concepts come through in the following modules that scaffold on each other from Level 1 to 3:

  • Practical Performance: Level 1: Korfball and Volleyball, Level 2: Turbo touch

and Badminton, Level 3: Mountain Biking, Futsal or their preferred sport of choice.

  • Science and Technology: Exercise Physiology (body response to exercise) and 

Biomechanics (mechanical laws relating to movement).

  • Relationships: Self-management and relating to others in the context 

games, and risk management in the context of outdoor activities.

  • Leadership development Opportunities to become better leaders, coaching.

teams, and critiquing contemporary leadership styles.

  • Critical Thinking: Reasoned, logical and thought out perspectives on 

the impact of society’s penchant for sport and leisure.

Year 11

Science is compulsory. You will be placed in either 11SCI [which allows you to continue into the Level 2 Sciences] or 11SCC [which does not allow you to continue into Level 2 Sciences] based on your Year 10 grades. 

Year 11 Physical Science [11PSC] is an additional Science course that is optional. It is designed for pupils who love and / or want to continue in the Sciences. It contains entirely different standards from 11SCI and is designed to provide a broader foundation in Science. Pupils who take 11PSC will be doing 8 periods of Science a week. This course is particularly advantageous, yet NOT required, for pupils wanting to continue into Physics and Chemistry.  

Year 12

Science splits into 3 Science courses at Year 12: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. To enter these courses, you need to at least pass the Year 11 external assessment that relates to that course i.e. Genetics for Biology, Acid and Bases for Chemistry and Mechanics for Physics. Talk to your Science teacher and careers advisor for more information and refer to the course booklet for other prerequisites. 

Year 13

Refer to the course booklet for prerequisites and speak to your teacher about what the Level 3 courses entail. 

Last month, the Instituto Cervantes launched its yearbook, Spanish in the World 2019, with the latest data showing that a total of 580 million people speaks Spanish (7.6% of the world’s population) in 21 countries of the world. It is the third most spoken language in the world, and second most used on the internet.

Learning Spanish and having first-hand knowledge of Hispanic cultures has long-term benefits to both our student and our community. New Zealanders who are multi-lingual have greater prospects in the international workplace and are more effective in taking NZ ideas and products to the world. In the future, trade with Latin America will become an increasingly important source of New Zealand’s export income. Producing students who are acquainted with, and comfortable in, a Hispanic environment will contribute to the forming of these links.

The fundamental goal of any language learning program is to travel to the target country and interact with the people. The value of studying and using the language at its source together with complete cultural immersion is immeasurable. There is no better way to learn about another country, its customs, and the way of life of its people than by experiencing it first-hand.

Te Reo Māori is a dynamic course promoting the revitalisation and use of Te Reo for everday use. The course also focuses on the Tikanga/customs and richness of the language that first named this land and explained its stories. With a resurgent interest amongst many parts of society and increased localised investment by iwi, Te Reo opens up many opportunities here and abroad to foster this taonga/treasure as part of the unique heritage that all people of Aotearoa share.

Year 12 Tourism and Hospitality

The Tourism sector was hit hard when our borders closed and cafes and activities were brought to a standstill. The good news is that it is bouncing back and, in the Tourism and Hospitality class, you will be trained to enter this exciting industry post Covid 19! The skills you learn in this class will be transferable across Retail too. You will do two weeks of work experience, outside class time, complete a barista course and complete four unit standards in class time. It is a great mix of practical, writing and interactive activities, and a great taste of the real world. See Mrs Bailey in Careers for more details.

Welcome to Workshop Technology! In Years 11, 12 and 13 we offer balanced courses that place an emphasis on project planning and management, practical skills, and problem solving. WTC at Year 11 requires no previous experience, and is a great entry into interpreting plans, health and safety, and the processes required to construct a project. Year 12 WTC builds on this, so completion of Year 11 course is recommended. The focus for Year 12 is on team projects, such as outdoor construction and furniture, incorporating a deeper understanding of project specifications.

Due to the increased freedom and responsibility at Year 13, completion of Years 11 and 12 Workshop Technology are required for entry. Here, students may choose what they will consruct, and how they will construct it. Project planning and management continue their importance as increased independence is encouraged.

Whether students are planning to enter the construction trades, or wanting to level-up their existing skills, techniques and problem sovling ability to unleash the maker within, Workshop Technology is a great example of practical, hands-on learning. Talk to Mr. McKee or Mr. Murray for more information.